pizza_puraPizza Pura, the new pizzeria on Depot Street in the River Arts District, tweets:

@PizzaPura is opening Thur, Apr. 4 at 11:30. We’ll close daily when we run out of dough. Thanks #avleat for your support.

A little more background here on Pizza Pura:

Owners of the wildly popular White Duck Taco in the River Arts District are branching out.

Pizza Pura will open in a soon-to-be vacant studio at Pink Dog Studios on Depot Street in April, according to Ben Mixson, a co-owner of White Duck Taco.

The restaurant will be run by Mixson and wife Laura Reuss, but the operation is a collaboration with Pink Dog owners Randy Shull and Hedy Fischer. Pizza Pura will serve Neapolitan-style pies, Mixson says.

 

6 Comments

  1. Pizza Pura uses imported ingredients. It’s not NY pie. They DO offer take out. Some hints on writing a useful information:

    Before you begin wildly tapping into your smart phone or covertly whispering into a lavalier mic at the table, let’s go over what makes a truly useful restaurant review.

    Provide relevant information
    Restaurant name. Where? Especially if there are several locations. Neighborhood? Are reservations needed and if so was yours honored – or at least within a reasonable time? Is there outdoor seating? Fireplace? View? Bar/lounge? Local procurement? Killer wine list or microbrew selection? How about kid-friendly? Parking tips? Happy Hour?

    Type of cuisine
    Does the menu live up to what’s advertised? What did you have, what can you recommend, what should people steer clear of and why. Do you find the food too salty, sweet, bland, or off in any way? Remember taste is in the buds of the beholder, so if you’re not into oysters, but order a couple anyway, don’t hold it against the establishment.

    Quality for the price
    Do you feel you got your money’s worth for the entire meal? Plenty of food for a doggy bag or not enough for a mouse? Take into consideration the freebie extras like bread, condiments, refills, fortune cookies, all the little things that make a meal complete yet aren’t itemized on the check.
    Mention good and bad price points (hopefully there aren’t any bad ones.) No need to list actual prices, but a sense of budget is helpful. For instance: “perfect spot for a cheap date” or “you’ll empty your wallet, but its worth every bite”

    Service
    Aside from the food, the quality of service is probably the best info you can provide to future patrons. Describe your experience from beginning to end, from reservation or host stand, to check delivery and farewell. Did you see the chef out on the floor chatting with diners? Were you rushed from course to course or interrupted more than necessary by the server? Was your table maintained at a good pace (water refilled, crumbed, cleared at the appropriate moments?) Give praise where earned and hints on how the resto could have done better, if needed.

    Atmosphere
    How was the lighting? Noise level? Musak? Artwork? Was the dining area clean and inviting? Seats, tables, and dinnerware in good repair? Did the atmosphere make you feel comfortable and welcome?

    Before you post your review, its a good idea to visit a place a couple of times before submitting. But if you feel your experience was so review-worthy it just can’t wait, by all means post it. Its also a good idea to check your facts lest a fellow reviewer be inspired to call you out on a minor detail, like validating parking, etc.

    What NOT to write
    Not to trample over Freedom of Speech, but rather write a classy and poignant review:

    If you own or manage a restaurant, don’t review it. Fake reviews can be sniffed out a mile away. And although review websites can be a thorn in a biz owner’s side, they also can offer up tips and information about how they are getting it right or how they can better execute service, products, etc from a customer’s perspective. Take advantage of that aspect – and respond accordingly.
    Bogus information Keep it real, here. Unless there really was a fly in the soup, don’t slander a place because you have an ax to grind or were slighted by the busboy. And if there was a ‘fly in the soup’ or any other major snafu, by all means bring it to the attention of the staff. They really do want to please their customers. If you’ve already left and taken the time to post a review – they can’t resolve the issue immediately.
    Potty Mouth. Nobody likes a smartass…

  2. peter smith says:

    pizzas are 10 dollars.

  3. Dirk Flytrap says:

    Holy crap! Two small, single serving, sparsely topped “pizzas” for $25!!! If you were hoping that the food would be affordable, like White Duck, you would mistaken. Don’t ask for a take out order either, they don’t do it. What pizza place doesn’t have take out? Oh, right. Pizza Pura.
    In this diner’s opinion, their pizzas should top out at $8, not $13/14.
    I’ll still visit the Duck but, will NOT be going back to Pura, unless their prices drop 30-40%.

  4. Awesome! Can’t wait for the $50 pizzas and being treated like I don’t matter

    • danielle plainview says:

      Tried it yesterday. Margherita pizza needed more basil but overall it was good. 12 bucks is a little much for a pie equal to about a NY slice, but quality was good. They refuse to serve their pizza to-go, which was VERY bizarre. Get some to-go boxes! We don’t care about the percieved “integrity” of your pie. ITS DOUGH WITH SAUCE AND CHEESE ON IT FOR GODS SAKE. Nurtitional value to cost ratio is amongst lowest of all “street foods”. The hipster/foodie/trust-fund/whitey crowd will ABSOLUTELY be thrilled with this place. The best part of my experience was when the over-caffeinated waitress started talking about the “science” behind the oven. BITCH, can I just have a slice of pizza please!

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